Remi completed her MA in Global Political Economy in the Department of Politics in 2018, and is now a researcher engaged in a number of research projects at SPERI. In September 2019 she will begin her ESRC-funded PhD under the supervision of Professor Genevieve LeBaron and Dr Liam Stanley. Her project will assess the effectiveness of worker-driven alternatives to corporate social responsibility as a method of protecting labour rights in global supply chains.

At SPERI, Remi has collaborated with colleagues and a number of workers’ rights organisations to produce a report about the state of corporate social responsibility initiatives in securing living wages for workers in the garment industry. The report is based on survey data collected from global clothing brands situated within broader dynamics of corporate power and responsibility in the global economy. Additionally, Remi is working on ensuring the impact of Professor LeBaron’s research on forced labour in the tea and cocoa industries, including engagement with many external stakeholders such as tea companies, ethical certifiers and NGOs.

She has also been part of the Postgraduate Research Experience Programme in Political Economy (PREPPE), a collaborative project researching the political economy of the Harvey Weinstein sexual abuse scandal. Specifically, this project explored the politics of scandal as a site of contestation in the context of gendered dynamics of sexual violence.

Research Interests

Remi’s research interests convene in their common concern with the everyday lived experience of individuals within capitalism, and the political economy of production and consumption. She is interested in the experiences of neoliberal development in the global South, as well as the increasing informalisation and insecurity of work across the global economy. Relatedly, she is interested in issues of labour exploitation and supply chain governance, particularly in worker-driven initiatives to improve working conditions in a variety of industries.

Remi is also interested in the everyday experience of capitalism in terms of how individuals ‘know’ the economy, and subsequently how they perceive themselves and act within it, with a specific focus on ideas and practices of ‘ethical’ consumption. This requires understanding how the economy is represented to individuals, and how that shapes understanding of – and therefore behaviour within – processes and dynamics of the economy itself.

Key Publications

Reports