Global-Governance-200Development and the Governance of a Globalising Political Economy

Programme leaders: Matthew Bishop and Tony Payne

This programme embraces research on the changing nature of development, the ensuing ‘clash of developments’ as states compete for advantage within a genuinely globalising political economy and the consequent, and highly complex, problem of how to realise in such a context the necessary and indeed improved level of governance that is required at a global level. SPERI researchers have sought to rethink the very concept of development to show its applicability to all states, including those conventionally deemed to be ‘developed’, and have charted the ‘long battle’ for global governance that has been fought continuously between differing groups of states and other actors since 1945. They are also addressing other key themes in the sphere of global development and governance, such as intellectual property rights (IPRs), migration, narcotics, production and trade, as well as the role of the Group of 20 (G20) as the institutional apex of a globalising political economy. SPERI researchers have lately initiated a collective blog series, entitled ‘The Coming Crisis’, which asks whether the global economy is again headed towards a further crisis on the scale of 2008-9.

Recent and forthcoming publications:

  • Matthew L. Bishop, ‘Rethinking the Political Economy of Development beyond “The Rise of the BRICS”’, SPERI Paper No. 30, 2016.
  • Matthew L. Bishop, ‘Negotiating Flexibility at UNGASS 2016: Solving the World Drug Problem?’, SPERI Global Political Economy Brief No. 5, 2016.
  • Anthony Payne and Nicola Phillips (eds), Handbook of the International Political Economy of Governance, Edward Elgar, 2014.
  • Stephen Buzdugan and Anthony Payne, The Long Battle for Global Governance, Routledge, 2016.
  • Anthony Payne, ‘The Global Governance of Global Crisis: Why the G20 was Created and What We still Need it to Do’, SPERI Paper No. 17, 2014.
  • Valbona Muzaka and Matthew L. Bishop, ‘Doha Stalemate: The End of Trade Multilateralism?’, Review of International Studies, 41 (2), 2015.
  • Andrew Baker, ‘The G20 and Monetary Policy Stasis’, International Organizations Research Journal 9 (4), 2014.
  • Matthew L. Bishop, ‘Rethinking the Political Economy of Development beyond “The Rise of the BRICS”’, SPERI Paper, forthcoming 2016
  • Matthew L. Bishop, ‘Negotiating Flexibility at UNGASS 2016: Solving the World Drug Problem?’, SPERI Global Political Economy Brief, forthcoming 2016.
  • Valbona Muzaka, In Pursuit of Health and Wealth: The Political Economy of Intellectual Property Protection in Pharmaceuticals and Agricultural Biotech in Brazil and India, Palgrave Pivot, forthcoming 2016.

Ongoing projects:

  • Matthew Bishop, Tony Payne and Nicola Phillips are seeking to map a new post-crisis theoretical agenda for the political economy of development grounded in the emergence of a type of ‘new development theory’ that reflects the dissolution of the old divide between the so-called ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ states.
  • Matthew Bishop is also working on the effects of rising power engagement in global governance; the distributional consequences of changes in global narcotics policy and regulatory reform; and the mapping of a new post-crisis research agenda for the political economy of development.
  • Andrew Baker retains an interest in the capacity and willingness of the G20 (and the other institutions of the reordered global financial architecture) to catalyse substantive changes in monetary and financial governance.
  • Valbona Muzaka continues to conduct research on the governance of intellectual property rights (IPRs), focusing especially on the discourses used to legitimise the current regime, the strategies deployed by those who seek to contest it ‘from below’ and the particular role played by rising powers in the governance of IPRs.
  • Nicola Phillips is researching the changing dynamics of governance in the global economy, with particular connection to the evolution of global value chains as the principal structures around which production and trade are now organised.