SPERI’s research partnership with the Foundation for European Progressive Studies (FEPS) has led to two research projects and a range of publications.

 

The post-crisis political economy of young people across Europe

Our project ‘The post-crisis political economy of young people across Europe‘ investigates the impact of the global financial crisis on young people across Europe today, and the role played by the crisis in explaining their situation and the emergent politics of intergenerational fairness.

Turning ‘intergenerational fairness’ into progressive policy, Kate Alexander Shaw

January 2018

In this policy brief Kate Alexander Shaw sets out a series of recommendations for how the ‘intergenerational fairness’ can be turned into progressive policies. The brief’s central argument is that progressives need to develop an analysis that connects a structural understanding of the problem with a set of policies that target the underlying causes of generational inequality, not just its most recent symptoms. This means getting to grips with the possibilities for redistribution between age groups, and the ways in which intergenerational inequalities relate to other kinds of inequality.

Drawing on analysis of the emerging politics of intergenerational fairness in five European nations: the United Kingdom, France, Spain, Denmark and Romania, this brief makes recommendations about how progressives should approach the politics of intergenerational fairness, before highlighting six policy areas in which they might look for progressive solutions. The six areas are 1) Employment rights and labour market protections 2) Taxation of asset wealth, including residential property 3) Improving private rented housing 4) Electoral reform 5) Pension reform and 6) Environmental policy.

Download: Turning ‘intergenerational fairness’ into progressive policy

Baby Boomers versus Millennials: rhetorical conflicts and interest-construction in the new politics of intergenerational fairness, Kate Alexander Shaw

January 2018

In this paper Kate Alexander Shaw analyses the current debate in the UK around intergenerational fairness. The paper argues that the intergenerational fairness debate has been almost entirely a post-crisis phenomenon in the UK, rising quickly up the agenda since 2010. The headline coherence of “intergenerational fairness” as a concept belies some important disagreements about its meaning and policy implications. Some strands of the debate are broadly progressive; others are more connected to the politics of fiscal conservatism. Kate’s paper looks at how the concept cuts across right-left politics in the UK and considers how representations of intergenerational fairness can be either solidaristic or conflictual, and the choice between these two frames has important implications for policy. The debate around intergenerational fairness, accelerated by the recent upsurge in youth electoral turnout, also raises difficult questions about the relative priority that should be attached to age and class in Britain’s political economy.

Download: Baby Boomers versus Millennials: rhetorical conflicts and interest-construction in the new politics of intergenerational fairness

Diverging Capitalisms? Britain, the City of London and Europe

Our project ‘Diverging Capitalisms? Britain, the City of London and Europe’, led by FEPS, Policy Network and SPERI considers the changing nature of the British economy, its place within the European economic space and the consequences of Brexit for Britain and the EU more broadly.

A series of policy briefs have been published through the project.

Brief No. 3: ‘Brexit Britain’: Where does the UK growth model go from here?

In this Brief Andrew Gamble and Scott Lavery, both of SPERI, offer a brief historical overview of the development of the UK growth model and the strategic orientation of British business groups. They outline how Brexit has problematised conventional economic and business strategies and the potential development trajectories for the British economy now that Article 50 has been triggered.The findings presented in this Brief take the analysis developed as part of the workshop entitled ‘After Brexit: British and EU capitalisms at the crossroads?’ held in Brussels on March 24th 2017.

Download Brief No. 3: ‘Brexit Britain’: Where does the UK growth model go from here?

Brief No. 2: Brief-2-EU-150EU economic governance after Brexit: Governing a disintegrating Europe

In this Brief Lucia Quaglia, University of York, and Waltraud Schelkle, London School of Economics, provide new insights on how fragmented political and economic interests, both internationally and intra-nationally, have been shaping EU economic policy-making in the wake of the global financial crisis, the Eurozone crisis and the UK’s referendum on EU membership. The findings presented in this Brief take the analysis developed as part of the workshop entitled ‘Diverging Capitalisms, Part 2: Brexit and new EU economic governance’ held in London in October 2016.

Download Brief No. 2: EU economic governance after Brexit: Governing a disintegrating Europe

The-impact-of-Brexit-on-the-City-and-the-British-economic-model-150Brief No. 1: The impact of Brexit on the City and the British economic model

In this Brief Helen Thompson and Leila Simona Talani consider the impact of Brexit on the City, focusing on two key aspects of the debate: the tensions between the City and democratic politics, and the challenges for the future of the City posed by the vote on 23 June for Britain to leave the European Union (EU). The analysis presents findings from the first workshop in the series entitled, ‘Diverging Capitalisms, Part 1: The City after the Crisis’ which was held in London in April 2016.

Download Brief No. 1: The impact of Brexit on the City and the British economic model.