Tag Archives for #GE2015

Deficit fetishism and the art of political bullshit: Part I

Jonathan Hopkin and Ben Rosamond

Attempts to refute bullshit by appeals to the ‘facts’ are likely to be unsuccessful as argumentative strategies Debates about economic policy in the recent UK General Election campaign were dominated by one particular claim: that the last Labour government, which left office in 2010, was wholly responsible for the deficit.  This claim became a central plank of the Conservative Party’s … Continue reading

15 July 2015 by
Categories: Austerity, British growth crisis, Politics and policy, Rethinking Recovery, Social science, SPERI Comment | Tags: , , , , , | 1 comment

Prospects for Britain’s socially and territorially fractured polity

Colin Hay

It’s still a ‘good election to lose, but too important not to win’ Between 24.4% and 27.5%, I reckon, of Britain’s registered voters are passably happy with the outcome of the 2015 General Election – 27.5% if you think SNP supporters are content, 24.4% if you think contentedness is confined to Tory supporters living (almost exclusively, but not quite) south … Continue reading

2 June 2015 by
Categories: Economics, Europe and the EU, Politics and policy, SPERI Comment | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

‘It’s the economy wot won it’

Mick Moran

Labour’s argument on the economy was condemned by the association of ‘the two Eds’ with New Labour’s record The general election result of last Thursday will rightly be seen as epochal: for the future of the Labour Party and the Liberal Democrats; for the future of the Union in the UK; and, quite possibly, after the now certain referendum in … Continue reading

13 May 2015 by
Categories: Economics, Politics and policy, SPERI Comment | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

A tale of two elections

Andrew Gamble

Labour is now confronted with a serious strategic dilemma, but the Conservatives also face huge economic and political challenges The election result surprised everybody, except perhaps Lynton Crosby.  The eleven pre-election polls accurately predicted the vote share of the Liberal Democrats and UKIP, but seriously underestimated the Conservatives and overestimated Labour.  Cameron needed a 7% lead over Labour to secure … Continue reading

11 May 2015 by
Categories: Economics, Europe and the EU, Politics and policy, SPERI Comment | Tags: , , , , | 1 comment