Tag Archives for Kate Alexander Shaw

New FEPS-SPERI policy brief: Turning ‘intergenerational fairness’ into progressive policy

A new FEPS-SPERI policy brief by Kate Alexander Shaw, ‘Turning ‘intergenerational fairness’ into progressive policy‘ is published today. In the new brief Kate Alexander Shaw sets out a series of recommendations for how the ‘intergenerational fairness’ can be turned into progressive policies. The brief’s central argument is that progressives need to develop an analysis that connects a structural understanding of the problem … Continue reading

30 January 2018 by
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Baby Boomers versus Millennials | New paper on the politics of intergenerational fairness

A new paper by Kate Alexander Shaw, published today, ‘Baby Boomers versus Millennials: rhetorical conflicts and interest-construction in the new politics of intergenerational fairness’ analyses the current debate in the UK around intergenerational fairness. The paper is part of our research project on the Political Economy of Young People in Europe, in collaboration with the Foundation for European Progressive Studies (FEPS), … Continue reading

18 January 2018 by
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Millennials versus Baby Boomers: words matter in the politics of intergenerational fairness

Kate Alexander Shaw

Rhetoric used today to describe intergenerational debates will shape tomorrow’s policies – and affect all of our futures The last several years have seen an upswell of interest in the idea of intergenerational fairness, based on concerns that today’s young people cannot hope to achieve the same prosperity as older generations.  The financial crisis of 2008-09, and the subsequent weakness … Continue reading

8 May 2017 by
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The post-crisis political economy of young people across Europe | New SPERI research project

With its tenth anniversary approaching, it is clear that the 2008 global financial crisis has had significant ramifications throughout Europe that are still being felt today. Many European economies remain stagnant, with sluggish wage growth and increasing labour market precariousness. Although all age cohorts have been affected by the specific impacts of the crisis, young people across Europe in particular … Continue reading

5 May 2017 by
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