Andrew is a Professorial Fellow and Professor of Political Economy.  He works on the politics of financial governance and macroeconomic policy, and on crises as moments of transformation. Andrew is interested in how economic ideas and theories are used politically and with what social consequences.

He is a co-editor of the journal New Political Economy. Prior to coming to Sheffield he spent 17 years at Queen’s University Belfast, in the School of Politics, International Studies and Philosophy.

Further information about Andrew can be found here.

Research Interests

Andrew has written several books on financial governance and numerous refereed articles over twenty years. He has also contributed to policy reports and advised governments, multilateral institutions and various non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

Andrew is currently working on three major projects:

  1. the comparative and international political economy of macroprudential regimes as a new form of systemic financial governance ten years on from the crisis of 2008;  
  2. the finance curse as both a real world process and a research agenda – involving the collection of evidence on the economic, social, political and geographical costs of oversized and overactive financial sectors;
  3. Tax spillover – a new multilateral framework and policy field, that takes the form of an international moral harm convention discouraging governments from pursuing tax policies that can be shown to be harmful to other states.

The latter two projects are being co-produced with a range of NGOs, most prominently the Tax Justice Network.

Key Publications

  • Baker, A., & Murphy R. (2019). The Political Economy of Tax Spillover: A New Multilateral Framework. Global Policy, 10:2, pp.178-192 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1758-5899.12655
  • Baker, A. (2018). Macroprudential regimes and the politics of social purpose. Review of International Political Economy, 25:3, pp.293-316.
  • Baker, A. & Wigan, D. (2017). Constructing and contesting City of London power: NGOs and the emergence of noisier financial politics. Economy and Society46(2), 185-210.
  • Baker, A. (2015). Varieties of economic crisis, varieties of ideational change: how and why financial regulation and macroeconomic policy differ. New Political Economy20(3), 342-366.
  • Baker, A., & Widmaier, W. (2014). The institutionalist roots of macroprudential ideas: Veblen and Galbraith on regulation, policy success and overconfidence. New Political Economy19(4), 487-506.
  • Baker, A. (2013). The gradual transformation? The incremental dynamics of macroprudential regulation. Regulation & Governance7(4), 417-434.
  • Baker, A. (2013). The new political economy of the macroprudential ideational shift. New Political Economy18(1), 112-139.
  • Baker, A. (2010). Restraining regulatory capture? Anglo-America, crisis politics and trajectories of change in global financial governance. International Affairs86(3), 647-663.
  • Baker, A. (2006). The Group of Seven: finance ministries, central banks and global financial governance. Oxfordshire: Routledge.