Matthew Bishop is a Research Fellow at SPERI and Senior Lecturer in International Politics in the Department of Politics, where he also earned his PhD and began his academic career. In the interim, he spent seven years at the University of the West Indies. He has held visiting positions at Warwick University, the Institute of Social Studies in The Hague, the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies, and Wuhan University in China.

He has consulted for various international bodies, including the Commonwealth Secretariat, the UK Department for International Development (DFID), and the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) on a range of development-focused issues.

Further information about Matthew can be found here.

Research Interests

Matthew’s main area of research interest is the political economy of development, with a particular focus on small states and the broad region of Latin America and the Caribbean. He has, of late, become increasingly interested in illicit economies, drug policy and gang violence, as well as applying ‘development’ ideas to the UK context.

He has a diverse range of projects and active research strands. These include: the rise of China and the redistribution of economic power in the global system, especially vis-à-vis the WTO; the impact of Brexit on Britain’s future trading relationships; the political economy of cannabis legalization in the Americas; the nature of conflict in Colombia after the peace accords; explaining rises in drug and gang-related violence in the Caribbean and the UK.

Key Publications

Books

  • 2017 Post-Colonial Trajectories in the Caribbean: The Three Guianas, Edited with P. Clegg and R. Hoefte (London: Routledge).
  • 2014 Democratization: A Critical Introduction (2nd edition, with J. Grugel, London: Palgrave Macmillan).
  • 2013 The Political Economy of Caribbean Development (London: Palgrave Macmillan).

Articles

  • Forthcoming ‘Why is China a Reluctant Leader of the World Trade Organization?’ with X. Zhang. New Political Economy. Part of a special issue co-edited with P. Murray-Evans on How are the Rising Powers Reshaping Global Economic Governance?
  • 2018 ‘The FIFA Scandal and the Distorted Influence of Small States’, with A. F. Cooper. Global Governance, 24, 1.
  • 2017 ‘Hemispheric Reconfigurations in Northern Amazonia: The “Three Guianas” Amid Regional Change and Brazilian Hegemony’, with P. Clegg and R. Hoefte. Third World Quarterly, 38, 2.
  • 2016 Rethinking the Political Economy of Development beyond “The Rise of the BRICS”, (Sheffield: Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute Paper No. 30).
  • 2015 ‘Doha Stalemate: The End of Trade Multilateralism?’, with V. Muzaka, Review of International Studies, 41, 2.
  • 2012 ‘The Political Economy of Small States: Enduring Vulnerability?’ Review of International Political Economy, 19, 5.
  • 2012 ‘Climate Change and the Future of Caribbean Development’, with A. Payne, Journal of Development Studies, 48, 10.